Rarely Seen Locations by the World’s Leading Photographers

EASTERN WORLD • DOCUMENTARY TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY


Documenting unfamiliar areas and cultures to share with the world.


John Wilkes was a London publisher best known for his Encyclopaedia Londinensis; or, universal dictionary of arts, sciences, and literature (1801-28). Wilkes frequently worked with Samuel John Neele, the engraver of this hand-colored map of “modern Asia.” The map reflects late 18th-century European geographic conceptions and terminology. India is referred to as “Hindoostan,” while much of the interior is shown as comprised of “Western Tartary” and “Chinese Tartary.” “Tartary” was a designation applied by Europeans to those parts of Asia inhabited by nomadic Turkic and Mongol peoples. This map shows Tartary as stretching from the Caspian Sea to the Pacific Ocean.

John Wilkes was a London publisher best known for his Encyclopaedia Londinensis; or, universal dictionary of arts, sciences, and literature (1801-28). Wilkes frequently worked with Samuel John Neele, the engraver of this hand-colored map of “modern Asia.” The map reflects late 18th-century European geographic conceptions and terminology. India is referred to as “Hindoostan,” while much of the interior is shown as comprised of “Western Tartary” and “Chinese Tartary.” “Tartary” was a designation applied by Europeans to those parts of Asia inhabited by nomadic Turkic and Mongol peoples. This map shows Tartary as stretching from the Caspian Sea to the Pacific Ocean.

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NORTH KOREA.

by David Guttenfelder

Few foreigners have had the chance to photograph what’s inside the North Korea, and one of these few is David Guttenfelder. Between 2000 and 2015, he made over 40 trips to North Korea as a photographer for the Associated Press, National Geographic Magazine and the New York Times.


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SIBERIA and MONGOLIA.

by Jimmy Nelson

CHUKCHI, SIBERIA

The Chukchi, or Chukchee, are an indigenous people inhabiting the northeasternmost part of Siberia, within the Russian Federation. They speak their own Chukchi language. Chukchis love storytelling; and according to Jimmy Nelson’s website, their folklore includes ‘myths about the creation of the earth, moon, sun and stars; tales about animals; anecdotes and jokes about foolish people; stories about evil spirits responsible for disease and other misfortunes; and stories about shamans with supernatural powers.’ They believe that all natural phenomena are considered to have their own spirits and that “the way you treat your dog in this life determines your place in heaven. ”

KAZAKH, MONGOLIA

The Kazakhs are descendants of the Turkic and medieval Mongol tribes, as well as the Huns, who were the famous nomadic people from the late 4th century, best known for being impressive horsemen and for their astounding military achievements.

Jimmy Nelson states on his website: ‘The ancient art of eagle hunting is one of many traditions and skills that the Kazakhs have held onto for the last decades. They rely on their clan and herds, believing in pre-Islamic cults of the sky, ancestors, fire and the supernatural forces of good and evil spirits.’

“Fine horses and fierce eagles are the wings of the Kazakhs”

Today, the Kazakhs in Mongolia are a semi-nomadic people but have been roaming the mountains and valleys of western Mongolia with their herds since the 19th century.

NENETS, SIBERIA—YAMAL

The Nenets are a tribe used to coping with extremely low temperatures ranging from —50°C in winter to 35°C in summer.

“If you don’t drink warm blood and eat fresh meat, you are doomed to die on the tundra”


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TURKISH ANATOLIA.

by Ara Guler

Ara Güler was a Turkish photojournalist, also known as Istanbul's Eye. He considered himself a visual historian rather than a photographer. Ara's philosophy on photography was that photography should reflect reality, including by providing people with a memory of their suffering. That’s why he did not value art in photography and preferred photojournalism, as he believed that art can lie, but photojournalism doesn’t. Reality and truth are the fundamental principles of morality for the Turkish people, and therefore perhaps why this renowned photographer chose to seek the truth. A retrospective of Magnum photographer Ara Güler has inspired many of his photographer friends within the Magnum organisation, and his followers and friends were deeply saddened to hear that he had died in Istanbul, aged 90, on 17th October 2018. We will always remember him as a great photographer who created a Turkish historical visual record that remain a piece of evidence from the past that is real and authentic.

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AFGHANISTAN.

by Steve McCurry

There is a reason why Steve McCurry is Steve McCurry. Although there are many other culture photographers who also capture striking moments around the world, Mr. McCurry’s photographs are different and unique. He captures real moments which are highly cinematographic and which seem to be very difficult to capture, as they do not happen often. The subjects, the setting and the colours all work in harmony in McCurry’s frames. In his interview with The Rotarian, he says ‘Photography is like a performing art. You aren’t still; you have to run around, jump around and move. You have to be quick to get a good picture.” He advises amateur photographers to observe and always photograph with heart. “You’ll do your best work when you’re inspired by a story or a place. Whatever it is in the world that matters to you, photograph that.”